(Very) Basic Intro to the Scrypt Hash

Scrypt is a slow-by-design hash function or more accurately, a KDF function. Its purpose is to take some input data, and create a fingerprint of that data, but to do it very slowly. A common use-case is to take a password and create an n-bit private key, which is much longer and more secure. Here at Qvault we use a similar KDF for securing user passwords.

For example, let’s pretend your password is password1234. By using Scrypt, we can extend that deterministically into a 256-bit key:

password1234 ->
AwEEDA4HCwQFAA8DAwwHDQwPDwUOBwoOCQACAgUJBQ0JAAYNBAMCDQ4JCQgLDwcGDQMDDgMKAQsNBAkLAwsACA==

That long 256-bit key can now be used as a private key to encrypt and decrypt data. For example, it could be the key in an AES-256 cipher.

Why not use the password to encrypt directly?

Most encryption algorithms, including AES-256, require that a key of sufficient length is used. By hashing the password, we can derive a longer, more secure, fixed-size key.

Furthermore, using a KDF like Scrypt provides additional benefits over a traditional hash function like SHA-2:

  • Computationally expensive and slow
  • Memory intensive (potentially several gigabytes of RAM is used to execute the hash)

Often times brute-force attackers will try to break encryption by guessing passwords over and over until they get it right. AES-256 and SHA-2 are fast, so an attacker would be able to guess many passwords per second. By using a slow hashing function like Scrypt to derive a key, we can force the attacker to waste more resources trying to break in.

Scrypt Step-by-Step

Scrypt can be visualized by some psuedo-code:

func Scrypt(
	passphrase, // string of characters to be hashed
	salt,  // random salt
	costFactor, // CPU/Memory cost, must be power of 2
	blockSizeFactor,
	parallelizationFactor, // (1..232-1 * hLen/MFlen)
	desiredKeyLen // Desired key length in bytes
) derivedKey {
	// we'll get to theis
}

Let’s go through the steps of converting those inputs into the desired derivedKey

1 – Define Blocksize

const blockSize = 128 * blockSizeFactor

2 – Generate Initial Salt

Scrypt uses PBKDF2 as a child key-derivation function. We use it to generate an initial salt. PBKDF2 has the following signature:

func PBKDF2(
	prf,
	password,
	salt,
	numIterations,
	desiredKeyLen
) derivedKey {}

We use it as follows:

const initialSalt = PBKDF2(HMAC-SHA256, passphrase, salt, 1, blockSize * parallelizationFactor)

3 – Mix Salt

Next, we mix the salt. We split initialSalt into splitSalt, which is a 2D array of bytes. Each sub-array contains 1024 bytes

splitSalt := [][1024]byte(initialSalt)
for i, block := range splitSalt {
	newBlock := roMix(block, costFactor)
	splitSalt[i] = newBlock
}

where roMix is:

func roMix(block, iterations){
	v := []
	x := block
	for i := 0; i < iterations; i++ {
		v[i] = x
		x = blockMix(x)
	}
	for i := 0; i < iterations; i++ {
		j := integerify(x) % iterations
		x = blockMix(x ^ v[j])
	}
	return x
}

Where integerify is defined by RFC-7914 and blockMix is:

func blockMix(block){
	r := len(block) / 128
	// split block into an array of 2r 64-byte chunks
	chunks := get2r64ByteChunks()

	x := chunks[len(chunks)-1]
	y := []
	for i := 0; i < len(chunks); i++{
		x = salsa20-8(x ^ chunks[i])
		y[i] = x
	}
	return [y[0], y[2], ...y[2r-2], y[1], y[3], ...y[2r-1]]
}

Where salsa20-8 is the 8-round version of the algorithm defined here.

4 – Finalize Salt

Now splitSalt has been mixed in such a computationally exhausting way that we will call it an expensiveSalt. Expensive salt will be a single array of bytes, so we need to concatenate all the subarrays in splitSalt.

expensiveSalt := append([], splitSalt...)

5 – Return Final KDF

return PBKDF2(HMAC-SHA256, passphrase, expensiveSalt, 1, desiredKeyLen)

The final pseudocode for our top level function is as follows:

func Scrypt(
	passphrase, // string of characters to be hashed
	salt,  // random salt
	costFactor, // CPU/Memory cost, must be power of 2
	blockSizeFactor,
	parallelizationFactor, // (1..232-1 * hLen/MFlen)
	desiredKeyLen // Desired key length in bytes
) derivedKey {
	const blockSize = 128 * blockSizeFactor

	const initialSalt = PBKDF2(HMAC-SHA256, passphrase, salt, 1, blockSize * parallelizationFactor)

	splitSalt := [][1024]byte(initialSalt)
	for i, block := range splitSalt {
		newBlock := roMix(block, costFactor)
		splitSalt[i] = newBlock
	}

	expensiveSalt := append([], splitSalt...)

	return PBKDF2(HMAC-SHA256, passphrase, expensiveSalt, 1, desiredKeyLen)
}

Or, if you prefer, the pseudocode as defined by Wikipedia:

Function scrypt
   Inputs:
      Passphrase:                Bytes    string of characters to be hashed
      Salt:                      Bytes    random salt
      CostFactor (N):            Integer  CPU/memory cost parameter - Must be a power of 2 (e.g. 1024)
      BlockSizeFactor (r):       Integer  blocksize parameter (8 is commonly used)
      ParallelizationFactor (p): Integer  Parallelization parameter. (1..232-1 * hLen/MFlen)
      DesiredKeyLen:             Integer  Desired key length in bytes
   Output:
      DerivedKey:                Bytes    array of bytes, DesiredKeyLen long

   Step 1. Generate expensive salt
   blockSize ← 128*BlockSizeFactor  //Length (in bytes) of the SMix mixing function output (e.g. 128*8 = 1024 bytes)

   Use PBKDF2 to generate initial 128*BlockSizeFactor*p bytes of data (e.g. 128*8*3 = 3072 bytes)
   Treat the result as an array of p elements, each entry being blocksize bytes (e.g. 3 elements, each 1024 bytes)
   [B0...Bp−1] ← PBKDF2HMAC-SHA256(Passphrase, Salt, 1, blockSize*ParallelizationFactor)

   Mix each block in B Costfactor times using ROMix function (each block can be mixed in parallel)
   for i ← 0 to p-1 do
      Bi ← ROMix(Bi, CostFactor)

   All the elements of B is our new "expensive" salt
   expensiveSalt ← B0∥B1∥B2∥ ... ∥Bp-1  //where ∥ is concatenation
 
   Step 2. Use PBKDF2 to generate the desired number of bytes, but using the expensive salt we just generated
   return PBKDF2HMAC-SHA256(Passphrase, expensiveSalt, 1, DesiredKeyLen);

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