What’s the Job Outlook for Computer Science Students?

As the world becomes more and more dependent on technology, the demand for computer skills has increased immensely as well. The opportunities in information technology across all industries have never been greater, as worldwide ICT spending is expected to reach $4.3 trillion this year.

In response, the sector has grown considerably into specialized fields, and computer science programs have pushed the envelope of how we train and prepare the next generation of technology experts. All in all, the world of computer science is getting bigger. And there is no better time to consider taking the path of computer science than now.

Job Prospects and Salary Expectations

Computer science graduates, especially those with high GPAs, are usually expected to land jobs with the highest salaries, with many employers paying well above expected salary grades. Many land jobs with starting salaries in the high five to six-figure range.

For instance, some leading software engineers get job offers with a $100K+ starting salary immediately after graduation. Computer network architects, information security analysts, and computer systems analysts are also among the highest paying jobs in the field, with salaries ranging from $90K to $110K. Other lucrative jobs include:

  • Mobile Application Developer
  • Data Scientist
  • Software Engineer in Test
  • Database Administrator
  • Backend/Frontend Web Developer
  • For a more comprehensive view, see our list of highest-paying CS jobs

Even with such high salaries, software and web developers, programmers, and testers have the most number of open jobs to be filled today, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. This just goes to show how valuable these skills have become today.

Indeed, in the middle of a global health crisis that has endangered millions of jobs across different fields of expertise, IT professionals are faring well overall — even better than most. The impact of the pandemic on tech jobs and businesses may have been worrying at first, with other fields having it worse, but things have since settled, and the future of tech is looking as bright as ever. Technology is seen as the ultimate solution to getting out of this crisis as soon as possible, so huge investments are to be expected — and therefore, more work and learning to be anticipated.

Courses and Online Degrees

Today, many college students choose the path of computer science, thinking the demand is still greater than the competition — and they’re not wrong. In response, more and more top universities have begun offering online computer science programs, with a deep focus on technical, problem-solving, and critical thinking skills in areas like software development, AI, blockchain, and data science. The goal of these institutions is to help train the next generation of computer science specialists. Many work with state-of-the-art technology like Microsoft Azure and AWS, with a focus on real-world case studies and hands-on experiential learning methods through educational innovations like Maryville University’s Cyber Fusion Lab.

The biggest drawback to this approach is that these legacy institutions often lack the tools to develop their online alternatives into little more than video lectures, which often cost just as much as attending class in person. With such a gaping hole in the education market, sites like Qvault have moved in to offer the same content with an online-first experience at a fraction of the cost.

And though it used to be that employers drew a distinction between graduates of traditional degrees and online degrees, this practice has lessened considerably, given the growth of online learning in recent years. Moreover, the surge in online learning today, considering the stay-at-home measures, will eventually erase whatever stigma is left against online diplomas.

Whether online or campus-based, computer science continues to prove to be an excellent career option for both undergraduates and graduates today — if not the best. It is even considered a better option than an MBA, as computer science-related jobs are expected to grow even more in the next few years, probably faster than jobs in other fields. Computer-science skill sets are needed in just about every business and industry, and this is why graduates can find jobs at any time — including in today’s dire times.

All in all, computer science is one of the few significant fields today proven to be truly omnipresent and timeless, and there is more than enough room for everyone to fill in an IT job in any industry.

Feature specially written for qvault.io

Feature by: JBradfield

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